What’s the fuss about killing newborns?

By Ruth Limkin You’ve probably heard about it by now, as it’s been picked up in both social media and mainstream media. Two philosophers working in Australian universities published an article in the British Medical Journal, arguing that it is morally defensible to kill newborns. They contend that whether the child has an illness, chromosomal condition such as Down Syndrome, or whether the mother is … Continue reading What’s the fuss about killing newborns?

Why I’m (sort of) glad that Britain has run out of money

This week the UK Chancellor, George Osborne, warned that Britain has run out of money, in news that would have left many readers cold. The UK is seen as a leading nation and if their financial margins are such, then it brings into stark focus the economic dilemma that much of the world is facing. Yet I was strangely glad to read the article and … Continue reading Why I’m (sort of) glad that Britain has run out of money

The post-New York blahs

By Ruth Limkin I’ve been in a New York state of mind. My fourth visit to the city for a recent holiday was as wonderful as the first three times. It’s a captivating city even with it’s concrete overload and it’s consumerist obsession, because it’s cultural richness is vast indeed. I’ve been back in Australia for a few days, yet still fortunate enough to be … Continue reading The post-New York blahs

When travel makes our world seem smaller: reflections from economy class

By Ruth Limkin Flying to the USA recently, I marveled at how international travel is now so easy compared to many decades ago. Granted, twelve hours in constricted economy class can make you dream of the days when global travel meant long, luxurious cruising yet in reality, when that was the way world was traversed, affording such an adventure would’ve probably been beyond me. As … Continue reading When travel makes our world seem smaller: reflections from economy class

How contentment crept up and caught me by surprise

By Ruth Limkin This is a story about shopping, but it’s mostly about hindsight, and how it illuminates the decisions that shape us. I have always loved buying clothes and shoes, although I’ve rarely been extravagant. I’d never pay full price and I always loved the thrill of the chase which came with finding a great sale. About three years ago, I felt a nudge … Continue reading How contentment crept up and caught me by surprise

breadandjustice – there’s an app for that

By Ruth Limkin Graham Clarke is a friend. After reading my recent post about Tomic, he tweeted something very kind that made me laugh out loud, saying “A dose of @ruthlimkin is like stepping on my bathroom scales – uncomfortable but a worthwhile reality check.” It made my day. So, if you’re up for a dose of breadandjustice regularly, there’s now an app for that! It’s free, and … Continue reading breadandjustice – there’s an app for that

Women without a voice and what we can do about it

By Ruth Limkin Last night I read about four women from the one family: Zainab, 19, Sahar, 17, and Geeti, 13, and Rona Amir Mohammad, 52. All four women died at the hands of close relatives less than two years ago. The household patriarch, along with one of his wives and his son were all found guilty yesterday of their murder. In a world uncomfortably … Continue reading Women without a voice and what we can do about it

I was going to write about Bernard Tomic…

By Ruth Limkin I was going to write about Bernard Tomic, the young sports star who won, and then lost, the hearts of the Australian public in the last week. It was only six days ago that we were all cheering him as he valiantly competed against Federer in the Australian Open. However, we were rolling our eyes a few days later as he claimed … Continue reading I was going to write about Bernard Tomic…

How many guns are too many guns? What’s wrong, what’s right, and why it matters.

By Ruth Limkin I’m intrigued. Today I read the following statement by a NSW Greens MP, David Shoebridge, “It is simply wrong that individuals can accumulate an unlimited number of deadly weapons with next to no scrutiny.” Shoebridge is introducing legislation into the NSW parliament to limit the number of guns that can legally be owned. It seems the magic figure is three, although why he … Continue reading How many guns are too many guns? What’s wrong, what’s right, and why it matters.

What the Captain did, and why we detest it

By Ruth Limkin Francesco Schettino is not only the shamed captain of the ill-fated cruise liner Costa Concordia, which fatally ran aground off the Tuscan coast. He is also now the inspiration between a new hashtag on twitter – #trippedandfell. The hashtag sprung from the disbelief at the Captain’s claims that he didn’t deliberately abandon ship while there were still hundred of passengers on board, … Continue reading What the Captain did, and why we detest it