3 reasons to care about the culture you live in

Hard work and some hate mail – you experience both when you care about the culture you live in and advocate for those who are harmed by the worst of it. So in the midst of busy days and full lives, why should we care about the culture we live in? Why not leave it to the professional activists, rather than getting entangled in difficult … Continue reading 3 reasons to care about the culture you live in

Breakthrough after breakthrough – the power of others

Just this week I was speaking to a courageous woman. She is courageous because she had reached the point of honesty with herself, and threw off the notion that she was fine. She realised instead that  a richer life awaited her if she acknowledged that she wasn’t okay and sought support. This was why my life had connected with hers, and why we had the chance to … Continue reading Breakthrough after breakthrough – the power of others

Wine O’Clock – not always a harmless hashtag

Who doesn’t love a good hashtag. They can be fun, flippant or a great search mechanism. But it doesn’t take long of scrolling through social media to see that Aussie women and wine have a close and burgeoning relationship. We now know that one third of Australian women are considered high-risk drinkers, starting as a social activity, moving to stress relief and then sadly becoming … Continue reading Wine O’Clock – not always a harmless hashtag

When we rally for one another

When a terrible thing happens to another human being, and the community at large rallies around them and speaks up on their behalf, it warms the soul. It happened just this week, when 21 year old James Milne was refused entry to a JB Hi-Fi store. The rationale given to James and his dad by the security guard was that James was banned for shoplifting. … Continue reading When we rally for one another

How the Ashley Madison affair exposes us all

I remember it like yesterday, even though it wasn’t. The nervous feeling in the pit of my stomach. Not being sure what to say to him. Feeling out of my depth. After all, he was the Attorney-General. Strangely, this was the memory prompted when the Ashley Madison affair came to light this last week. For those fortunate enough to have been out of internet range this week, Ashley … Continue reading How the Ashley Madison affair exposes us all

Lessons from Alcatraz that I keep on my fridge

By Ruth Limkin I have a small magnet on my fridge. It’s from Alcatraz Prison, and lists Regulation 5 – “You are entitled to food, clothing, shelter and medical attention. Anything else you get is a privilege”. I bought it as a humourous reminder of a holiday and of a wonderful day exploring what is now a tourist attraction. However, I also bought to remind me … Continue reading Lessons from Alcatraz that I keep on my fridge

Small starts and significant success – how communities make a difference

By Ruth Limkin Last night I heard about small successes which made me a little bit teary and very much happy. The news in and of itself was less than earth-shattering, but for the disadvantaged children involved, it may be life-changing. The charity I work with runs a medium term food support program called the Fresh Start Program. The philosophy of the program is that we partner … Continue reading Small starts and significant success – how communities make a difference

A sneak peek of “Right Social Justice: Better Ways to Help the Poor” – out soon!

By Ruth Limkin Shameless plug time. I’m a contributing author for a book which is coming out shortly, and I think everyone should buy a copy (or two). My chapter looks at community development by the church and charity sector, and was an absolute honour to write. So often, the immense contribution by the not-for-profit and volunteer fuelled sectors get overlooked. I know so many wonderful … Continue reading A sneak peek of “Right Social Justice: Better Ways to Help the Poor” – out soon!

Gasping for breath: why young Australians need intentional support

By Ruth Limkin I heard something the other night that took my breath away. It did so because I had several childhood friends with severe asthma and it’s impact should not be minimised. Their struggle to breathe, the constant threat to their life, their fear that their illness would overtake them all made their burden one which deserved the very best support. No-one questioned it’s medical legitimacy. … Continue reading Gasping for breath: why young Australians need intentional support