The slavery of freedom: what a 19 year old’s virginity teaches us about ourselves

By Ruth Limkin I was disturbed as I read the article. A young woman was being offered to the highest bidder for four days. Four days of sexual servitude. Four days in which she will lose her virginity as a commodity to a man who has little interest in loving her. Four days in which she is effectively bonded to him, because he has money … Continue reading The slavery of freedom: what a 19 year old’s virginity teaches us about ourselves

Before you occupy Wall Street (or my city)

By Ruth Limkin Wall Street has been ‘occupied’ for a month now. According to the Wall Street Journal the protest movement in New York also now has $300,000 in donations, which is a little ironic considering the exact cause being donated to is still undefined. The Wall Street Journal reported the following: “For the most part, the protest action remained loosely organized and there were … Continue reading Before you occupy Wall Street (or my city)

The biggest problem with boat people

By Ruth Limkin Sometimes it seems there’s so many issues in the world, with so little time to learn about them. We know that there’s more than meets the eye, and that relying on mainstream media soundbites and headlines rarely makes for a well informed view. For many of us, the arrival of ‘boat people’ – better referred to as asylum seekers – is one … Continue reading The biggest problem with boat people

Not what you think: the real revolution from Steve Jobs

By Ruth Limkin I saw the news that Steve Jobs had passed away on my iPad. It was sad to hear of a man who met his end early, leaving behind a wife, children, and friends. Much has already been written about his innovation, and his ability to create products that people loved. There’s no doubt he was a brilliant creator. While I was someone … Continue reading Not what you think: the real revolution from Steve Jobs

Nothing to complain about, much to consider – reflecting on Somalia

By Ruth Limkin My comfortable Sunday afternoon was afflicted. I have been aware of the enormity of the famine in Somalia, like most of us who have internet access, although I suspect that I largely fail to comprehend it. How can I imagine the pain of starving to death, when I live in Australia and have the luxury of choosing what to eat? I have … Continue reading Nothing to complain about, much to consider – reflecting on Somalia

Dear PETA, please put some clothes on

By Ruth Limkin It’s a little known fact that William Wilberforce, who was the driving force for the abolition of the legal slave trade, also started the RSPCA.It’s one more reason I admire him so much. The mistreatment of animals is abhorrent, and as an animal lover, I find it distressing. It’s also sociologically disturbing, as we know that people who abuse animals are more likely … Continue reading Dear PETA, please put some clothes on

When leadership isn’t leadership

By Ruth Limkin I feel sorry for our Prime Minister. Winning government didn’t actually mean winning government just over 12 months ago, when she had to sign a formal alliance with the Greens and court three independents. Can our current leader really said to be leading when news reports contain sentences like this – “The federal government is being forced to implement the pokies cap … Continue reading When leadership isn’t leadership

Good sorts, bad sports and what’s really inappropriate in footy

By Ruth Limkin I’m the first to applaud when people or organisations promote a culture of respect for women. But I’m at a loss as to why Peter Peters, the media manager for Manly Sea Eagles, was suspended for calling a female reporter a ‘good sort’. His subsequent parting of ways with the club, with redundancy package, is apparently due to more than just this … Continue reading Good sorts, bad sports and what’s really inappropriate in footy

It’s okay – just break the law

By Ruth Limkin It would be funny if it weren’t so, well, illegal. For very good reasons, commercial surrogacy is banned in Australia. It’s against the law for you to pay someone here or overseas to conceive and carry a child that you will then take and call your own. So when a family law specialist, Professor Jenny Millbank, heard about two sets of parents who … Continue reading It’s okay – just break the law

The problem with our laws

By Ruth Limkin The widening scandal from News of the World’s alleged phone hacking activities continues to claim victims. Today’s sad news of the death of whistleblower Sean Hoare, being described as unexplained but not suspicious, is a window into unhealthy lives and what seems to have been an unhealthy culture. Hoare has been struggling with drug and alcohol addiction for some time, and his … Continue reading The problem with our laws